Author: timmooney

Best of Pedalshift 064: Keeping Hands & Feet Warm on Bike Tour

December means (for a lot of us) one thing: friggin cold hands and feet. On this best of the podcast, let’s see if we can find some ways for keeping hands and feet warm on bike tour, and maybe even your chilly commutes! Also, a listener-recommended winter tour for a warmer overall ride! Originally podcast December 8, 2016.

Best of Pedalshift 064: Keeping Hands & Feet Warm on Bike Tour

The post Best of Pedalshift 064: Keeping Hands & Feet Warm on Bike Tour appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 186: Thanks Bicycle Touring 2019

Gather round the virtual campfire where fellow listeners and bike tourists join together to give all their reasons to say, thanks bicycle touring!


thanks bicycle touring

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 186: Thanks Bicycle Touring 2019 (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live

Coming in December… Saturday 12/7 3pm EST! New tour reveal, revisiting cycling WNY and an AMA!

Pedalshift Live - December 7, 2019

See you in March!

2020 National Bike Summit

I’ll be presenting at the 2020 National Bike Summit! Details to come, but looking to do a meetup if listeners will be in DC. 

Thanks Bicycle Touring

 
Hi Tim, this is Vince Greco from Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. I hope this isn’t too late to get into U. I know it’s a day after the deadline but one of the share what I’m thankful for that bicycle touring. I am thankful for all the places and the distance that bicycle touring can take me, but this year in particular. I am thankful for a beautiful fall Gap ride with motion decent, although colder than I expected whether it was nice to see the Gap in a different season, cuz usually I end up writing in the spring or early summer, but I’m also very thankful for your podcast. Actually. I ended up adding the entire Montour Trail into my ride. In fact, I did a loop. I started in Cumberland went out to Pittsburgh on tour and came back to Cumberland again, but I heard about riding the Montour from your podcast and how to do that. So just wanted to say thanks.
 
 

 
Hey Tim, Brian Benton a long time listener and the podcast I think I haven’t missed any episodes. So my my thankful thing I would say I’m thankful for the opportunity. I had this year off, you know and Gap trail with my son. He graduated with his PHD in physical therapy in May and then the Stars aligned we were able to do an eight-day Bike Tour since I’m a teacher. I had this summer off and he hadn’t started his job yet. He isn’t a cyclist but he was an incredibly excellent shape from playing college level Ultimate Frisbee on his biggest complaint on the trip was his butt hurt em, I think we can all relate to that and one of the best memories I have from the trip was standing at a waterfall on the gap for 30 minutes and neither of us felt the need to talk. I don’t know if we’ll ever get to do this again ever, but that makes this just an extra special trip. So I say thanks Tim for the motivation to do the CNO and GAP Trails. I have a memory with my son that I’ll never forget dead. Thursday for the podcast 
 

We don’t celebrate thanksgiving where I’m from (New Zealand), but practicing thankfulness is always nice so I thought I’d join in. 
 
I’m thankful for the friendly and helpful people I’ve met through cycling. My local bike shop has been really great with helping me understand basic bike maintenance, and what I do and don’t need. I’m also thankful for the cool bike activist people in my area that I’ve met recently. They campaign for better cycling infrastructure, lawmaking, and driver/biker education, and I feel lucky to have made some awesome new friends. (Rory in New Zealand)
 

 
I have a kind of strange thing I give thanks for. I like to listen to audiobooks when on long rides; what I’ve found is that books, or sections of books, get linked in my mind to the places I was riding while listening to them. For instance last spring I rode down from Astoria (re)listening to mostly Robert Heinlein books. I was on a book called Friday in southern Oregon and I can’t think of the Seven Devils without thinking of that book too. (Ray)
 

 
I think my reflections are like my fellow travelers.  Reflections of kindness, beauty, making friends, overcoming challenges and exploration fill the bicycle travelers’ “carts.”  I’m no different.
 
As a photographer I have always loved sharing (marketing) images of what I see around me.  One of my favorite slogans is “seeing is believing.”  So many people in our face-paced society never or seldom take the time to SEE the world around them.  
 
Seeing is much easier when you travel by bicycle.   You can actually choose to SEE and to capture a moment that is in front of you.  Sharing images are easy in today’s world, so now everyone can enjoy it ~ not just you.  
 
The opportunity to SEE is my favorite thing about bicycle travel.  SEEing never lets you down ~ it makes memories forever! (Keith)
 

 
I guess I’m thankful for buying an e-bike. It’s kind of reinvigorated by love bicycling. I love riding it and it’s just it’s just the best thing it’s kind of heavy, but it it gets the job done. It’s a tract verb plus and got a good deal on it, and I put the 700 Mi on it since Memorial Day. (Mark)
 

 
I’m thankful for all of the great people I’ve met through biking. You won’t meet better people than you will in the cycling community.(Scott)
 

 
I’m thankful to have been blessed with a home on the C&O. I am especially blessed to ask passersbys if I can assist them. I’ve met some wonderful people who have stopped to use hose, have a snack or rest by fire pit. I am so very Thankful to be on the trail.(Clara)
 

 
I’m thankful that at 62 years old I can still cycle 50-60 miles a day. Thankful for all the friends I’ve made over the years while biking and the kindness people show you while on the trails. I had a flat tire once and every person that rode by stopped to offer assistance. A great group of people!(Diane)
 

 
 
Bicycling has really saved me from myself. At 345 and gaining my PTSD was making me eat myself to death. I was so depressed that I thought of suicide daily. I figured I could eat till my hearts content and be dead in a year. When it didn’t happen fast enough I got hostile. Fired, fat and hostile I ran low on money and took to the trail for cheap transportation. 2 years ago and I’m 210 now, ride almost every day sometimes as far as 60 miles , sometimes pulling my dog to the park. I’m so thankful I stumbled upon this obvious solution to both my mental and physical health.(Paul)
 

 
I am so grateful that the Great Allegheny Passage runs through my home town of Connellsville. The town that boomed in the coal and coke era is slowly being revitalized thanks to the formerly under appreciated beauty of the area that is now highlighted by the trail. I am blessed to be witnessing that rebirth, and to still be able to enjoy the freedom of riding miles and miles with no traffic concerns. I am thankful to be part of the wonderful diverse community of bikers, all sharing a childlike joy found in biking to new places. (Barb)
 

 
Thankful that I am in my cathedral of light with the sunlight filtering through the green or gold in areas we would never see unless you are on the seat of a bike!(Mary Ann)
 
 

 
 
Love riding the GAP, Ive met people from all over, the scenery is 2nd to none, hope to ride again soon before it gets to cold.(Phil)
 

 
I am thankful for still being able to ride. I know it won’t last a long time, but while it does, every ride is special! (Johnny)
 

 
Thankful I’ve been able to ride the GAP / C&O in it’s entirety in 2015 and many varying rides on portions of it. Riding in over a dozen MS 150 rides and recently riding a ride from Los Angeles to San Diego for The MS Society as well. Always feels good to help people as I’m riding & enjoying the bike.(Tom)
 

 
Thankful for all out great R2T trails for us runners to run on!!!!!!(Anthony)
 

 
I am thankful I got the opportunity to ride from Pittsburgh to D.C. this summer. One of my major bucket list rides checked off!(Ed)
 

 
I’m thankfull for two great rides on the GAP one in the spring and one in the fall. Thankful for the great weather I experieced on both occasions and spectacular color on the fall ride. Thankfull I have a friend who now has an eBike like me so we can travel together and thankfull we can cost share.(Roxanne)
 

 
The freedom, the openness, opportunity to just go. Im thankful for that. Grateful and blessed to have had what i feel to be an epic roundtrip on the GAP and C&O. It changed my life. The people i met changed me. And this was my first time being on those trails. Im thankful for it all!(Ryan)
 

 
I am truly thankful for the opportunity to explore and have crazy adventures on two wheels. To have a sister Kathleen who travels with me on long journeys, constantly inspires me to keep going & refuses to give up regardless of injuries, bike malfunctions and inclement weather. In addition.. she has opened my eyes to this great cycling community who are some of the most magnificent memorable people I have ever met!
– Cheers to all & have amazing holidays!!!(Stephanie)
 

 
I am thankful for family and good friends. Bicycle touring is great but nothing replaces family & friends. Invite them along.(PPP)
 

 
I am thankful for all the wonderful people that I have met along my journey on the c&o the gap and also the Montour trail now. I’m thankful that my life is started over in a better way. Before I started my journey October 9th 2019 everyday I contemplated suicide. My depression and all had me so bad I didn’t like people I didn’t like my own life. But since I started my journey on the c&o in Harpers ferry I have met so many people, so many good people they have changed my outlook of life and now I can’t see my life any other way thank you to everybody that has been there to help me out mentally physically financially, much love to everyone. (Michael)
 

 
 
I’m thankful for ALL of these, in terms of bike-touring!
The people/experiences are perhaps at “the top”, but everything else is “right behind” ;-] (Pete)
 

 
I am thankful for my health that allows me to feel the sense of wonderment that I experience when riding somewhere far from home under my own power. It is a feeling of vulnerability and excitement all wrapped up in one.(Chris)
 

 
I’m able to take something that I use for two wheel therapy, commuting, hauling from the grocery store, riding with friends & family, achieving personal stretch goals, and then take it on a vacation self-supported at low cost and low emissions to some of the most beautiful places in the world as well as down the road from home. From an over-nighter to extended travel, how could I not be thankful for that? 🙂 (Rod)
 

 
The communities and organizers who have created safe, integrated as well as alternative routes for me as I enter and explore different regions.(Paul)
 

 
I’m thankful to have access to a machine that lets me slow down and truly enjoy the journey.(Peggy)
 

 
I’m grateful that the bear on the trail ahead of us ignored the pebbles we were firing at it with our slingshots. We thought it would just leave and we could continue bikepacking on the trail. Instead we had to push our bikes through a river to get past it.(Adrian)
 

 
I’m thankful for my health and for the kindness of strangers (also, you have an awesome last name 🙂 (Suzanne Mooney)
 

 
Nice surprises, like a beautiful sunrise in the morning when I didn’t expect it. Thankful when I manage to weather difficulties, and come through them (Caroline)

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 186: Thanks Bicycle Touring 2019 appeared first on Pedalshift.

Twitter to Hit Muffle on Advocacy Ads and 501(c)(4)s

My post, Twitter to Hit Muffle on Advocacy Ads and 501(c)(4)s on Twitter’s new ad policy is over at the Bolder Advocacy blog. First para:

In response to larger criticism leveled against social media companies taking foreign money for paid advertisements that influence American elections, Twitter announced a major change to its advertising policy that overcorrects so substantially that it outright bans many environmental, public health, and civil rights organizations from being able to target their messages.

The policy is part of a disturbing trend—the true “town square” is no longer private property, but rather for-profit corporations that can limit expression with their onerous Terms of Service. I’ll stipulate Twitter (and Google… and Facebook…) is not taking away expression from non-paid posts, but as you probably notice in your everyday use of social media, your unpaid content just doesn’t get to the eyeballs of too many people these days. Paid ads are the only way to truly leverage this new town square, and its perfectly legal in most circumstances for the owners to exclude whomever they want.

The Pedalshift Project 185: Emergency Fixes

The episode I hope nobody needs to use… emergency fixes if you run into serious mechanicals or sudden cold snaps on your next bike tour.


The Pedalshift Project 185: Emergency Fixes

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 185: Emergency Fixes (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live

Coming in December… Saturday 12/7 3pm EST!

Pedalshift Live - December 7, 2019

What are you thankful for?

The annual Thanksgiving show drops in a few weeks and there’s still time to get your input into the show. What are YOU thankful about in the realm of bike touring? Call the Pedalshift voicemail and add your voice to things… take a minute and tell everyone what you’re thankful for. Be anonymous if you’d like… also email in your thoughts or hit social media with them.

The Lab: Emergency Fixes

  1. See prior episodes 046 and 087 for other tips
  2. Dealing with a busted rack – metal splint plus zip ties… hose clamps if you got em

broken rack splint

3. Temp drop? Layer up with newspaper or anything else you have on hand in between your layers. (H/T CCC)

4.  Scotchcast or fiberfix – 3M casting tape … you can get it at hardware, vet hospital or even emergency health center. Listener carries 1 roll and a bag with some cut pieces you can fix rim cracks and tent poles and many more issues they are lite just need warm water and dry in minutes why be stranded it can be bought around $5 to $10 this is a waterproof seal and strong as steel i keep seeing the same thing over and over rim crack no issue fix in minutes and finish the tour 

5. Lost a bolt? Rack bolts shear off? Check out the rest of your bike to cannabalize something that’s less important. Water bottle rack bolts usually are the same size as rack ones! (H/T CCC

6. Duct tape and zip ties can McGuyver your way through a lot.

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 185: Emergency Fixes appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 184: Documenting and Sharing Your Bike Tour

So you’re heading out on bike tour and want to document it for yourself, friends, family and more? On this episode: tips on sharing your bike tour with the world!


The Pedalshift Project 184: Documenting and Sharing Your Bike Tour

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 184: Documenting and Sharing Your Bike Tour (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live

Coming in December… Saturday 12/7 3pm EST
 
Pedalshift Live - December 7, 2019
 

What are you thankful for?

The annual Thanksgiving show drops in a few weeks and there’s still time to get your input into the show. What are YOU thankful about in the realm of bike touring? Call the Pedalshift voicemail and add your voice to things… take a minute and tell everyone what you’re thankful for. Be anonymous if you’d like… also email in your thoughts or hit social media with them.
 

The Lab: Sharing Your Bike Tour

Why document?

  • Let’s friends and family track your adventure
  • Safety log
  • Gives you something to look back on
  • Maybe fodder for something else? 

Ways to share

  • Blog/Writing
    • Old school. Especially good if you’re a writer more than a talker.
    • Tons of platforms that are free, but consider some of the bike tour specific ones like Cycleblaze, CGOAB, etc.
  • Facebook
    • Broad reach, lots of people on it
    • Can limit exposure if you want
    • Check out PPP on FB. He does a nice job.
  • Twitter
    • Great for immediate hits and also can include location pings
    • Low impact on your data plan
    • Microjournaling
  • Instagram
    • My personal choice for micro journaling these days
    • Creates a visual map to go back to
    • Allows for some written material too
    • Autopost to other platforms
  • Audio
    • I get a lot of questions on this, for perhaps obvious reasons
    • Yes you can get a professional recorder
    • iPhones are more than adequate for field recording
    • The white earbuds? Sneaky good mics!
    • Voice memo app is perfectly great and simple to use. There are others.
    • Record in the highest fidelity you can – compressing to mp3 in the field may save space, but you sometimes lose the ability to EQ properly.
    • Record a lot, edit at home
  • Video
    • Not my priority, but always glad I have it
    • Takes SO. MUCH. TIME. to go through and edit
    • Vlog style versus doc style
    • Live broadcasts really aren’t worth the data hit and battery hit
    • Record in the highest quality you can – I get a bigger phone storage capacity expressly for this.
    • If you’re a drone pilot, be mindful of flight restrictions. Also… use sparingly?
  • Content
    • Focus on people and experience
    • Know that touring alters perception… you may be surprised at what you document
    • Don’t over document. If the trip becomes more about that than the ride, you might regret it (caveat… if your primary reason is to make a doc of a trip rather than go on a tour and document it)
    • Know your audience… what are they interested in?
  • Expectations afterwards
    • There are *so many* journals out there!
    • Ultimately this journal is a gift for you down the line to look back to

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 184: Documenting and Sharing Your Bike Tour appeared first on Pedalshift.

Kentucky contested elections

I wrote a draft piece for AFJ on what nonprofits could do should the gubernatorial race in Kentucky end up as a contested election, but since it’s unlikely to be an issue I’m posting it here instead. Oddly enough, it’s cribbed from another piece I’ve written on presidential contingent elections that I might be posting here too.


What Can Nonprofits Do if the Kentucky Governor’s Race is Contested?

On November 5, Kentucky voters went to the polls to elect their next governor. At the end of the night, the apparent winner was Attorney General Andy Beshear with a margin of approximately 5000 votes, representing than 1% of the total votes cast. Incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin refused to concede, citing unnamed “irregularities,” promising to pursue additional recanvasing and recount remedies. State Senate President Robert Stivers suggested that the decision may ultimately be decided in a contested election before the Senate, a process that has not been used to determine Kentucky’s governor since 1899.

According to University of Kentucky law professor Joshua Douglas, post-election relief in Kentucky has three phases—a recanvass, a recount, and a contested election. A recanvass is a double-check of the ballots cast to make sure there were no adding errors. A recount requires a petition to the Franklin Circuit Court and would need to be funded by the requesting candidate. Recounts typically take several weeks, and according to Professor Douglas, typically amounts in modest changes to vote totals. Following a recount, the losing candidate has the option to petition the state legislature within 30 days following the final action of the state election board. The legislature chooses a committee with 11 randomly chosen members—8 from the House and 3 from the Senate. After a hearing and submitting a report, the full legislature sits in a joint session to determine the next governor. KRS 120.195.

What nonprofits can do in a contested election

At first blush, a contested election displays elements of electoral and legislative activity. The outcome is decidedly electoral, but the decision makers are traditional legislators and will be lobbied extensively by interested parties once it’s clear their votes will carry the day. 

What can 501(c)(3)s do?

Despite federal tax law’s prohibition on partisan electioneering, many 501(c)(3) public charities probably spent the election season focusing on nonpartisan get-out-the-vote activity and publishing nonpartisan voter guides. That’s because federal tax law permits 501(c)(3)s a broad array of election-focused options, so long as nothing they say or do explicitly or implicitly supports or opposes a candidate for public office. 

501(c)(3)s are also allowed to lobby legislators, so long as they are mindful of federal tax law’s cap on that activity. The IRS has not ruled whether the vote in a contested election qualifies as legislation for purposes of lobbying, but it’s plausible it would consider the vote by the state legislature to be considered similar enough to a legislative act that it would qualify as lobbying. U.S. Senate confirmations and ratification of treaties are unicameral actions the IRS considers legislative in nature, so it’s possible it would consider this work as lobbying to be tracked and reported by 501(c)(3)s.

However, this does not open the door for 501(c)(3)s to let state legislative members know which way to vote because federal tax law’s strict prohibition on supporting or opposing candidates would extend to the contingent election. There are still candidates for governor, it’s just the voting venue that has shifted. That does not mean charities and foundations must remain silent as the political earthquake shakes Frankfort. 501(c)(3)s are uniquely positioned to educate the public on the unusual process, the law, and all of the potential scenarios that could happen. As noted below, there will be millions of dollars flowing to more partisan actors. 501(c)(3)s will be critical nonpartisan educators during this fractured time.

What can other 501(c) organizations do?

Other 501(c) organizations have more freedom to act in a partisan political manner, but they are subject to federal tax law limits. Social Welfare 501(c)(4)s, Labor 501(c)(5)s, and Trade Association 501(c)(6)s are likely to be the most active participants in advocating support for specific candidates before the legislature during the contested election.

Federal tax law allows these organizations to engage in partisan political activity so long as it doesn’t become their primary activity. The IRS does not give a precise definition for primary activity, but most legal practitioners agree these 501(c)s can legally engage up to, but not over, 50% partisan activity before the IRS would consider the organizations to be acting beyond the scope of their exempt purpose. 

501(c)s that are active in a close election may find themselves close to the edge of this limit by the time an electoral college stalemate occurs. A quirk of the timing of the contested election may benefit some of these active participants. Because the election contest process may begin as late as December 25, and the process includes formation of a special committee as a precursor to the ultimate vote, it’s very likely the joint session does not sit until after the beginning of the new year. Organizations that operate their fiscal year from January 1-December 31 benefit. Their limits on partisan political activity effectively reset on January 1st, likely before the joint session gavels in and the contested election vote happens. 

These groups are able to make independent expenditures—express advocacy communications that are not coordinated with any of the candidates—up to tax law limits, all reportable to the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance. KRS 121.015(12). 501(c) organizations that are sometimes referred to as “dark money” groups may also be particularly active during contested elections, releasing advertising, videos and other public communications that support or oppose candidates but do not contain express advocacy and therefore go unregulated and unreported to the state. 

What can other nonprofits do?

Unlike their 501(c) counterparts, federal tax law insists that partisan political activity be the primary purpose of political groups organized under Section 527 of the Tax Code. They have the most freedom to operate, particularly through independent expenditures. SuperPACs in particular will be the most active. Should a contested election happen, contributions to the candidates are less important than public communications and direct contact with the members of the legislature, so independent expenditures are the ideal vehicle for a political organization’s activity. That is precisely what SuperPACs are built for. After Citizen’s United, individuals and corporations may contribute unlimited amounts to SuperPACs. It’s not difficult to imagine a flood of incoming money to SuperPACs redirected as a firehose aimed at lobbying the Kentucky legislature and also the general public in the form of aggressive advertisements, both broadcast and online. Unlike “dark money” groups, these expenditures will be reported to the state although with the compressed time involved between the final certification of the election and the contested election, it’s unclear how much impact this disclosure will have on shaping opinion.

What does this mean?

Should Sen. Stivers prediction of a contested election come to pass, nonprofit organizations will be critical voices during this chaotic, but critically important time. Awareness of the rules ahead of time allows for a more nimble response by nonprofits when it becomes apparent that the next governor of Kentucky may be determined by the legislature, not the voters.


Sidebar… a big hat tip to  Josh Douglas for his piece on the process of contested elections. I linked it above, but it’s worth high fixing again.

The Pedalshift Project 183: Touring With Dogs, Revisited

Ever think about hitting the road with your canine companion? Pedal with the pooch? I got out on the C&O a couple of times in the last month with Belle Starr and wanted to share some of my newer takes on bicycle touring with dogs.


The Pedalshift Project 183: Touring With Dogs, Revisted

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 183: Touring With Dogs, Revisited (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live

Coming in December… Saturday 12/7 3pm EST
 
Pedalshift Live - December 7, 2019
 

What are you thankful for?

The annual Thanksgiving show drops in a few weeks and there’s still time to get your input into the show. What are YOU thankful about in the realm of bike touring? Call the Pedalshift voicemail and add your voice to things… take a minute and tell everyone what you’re thankful for. Be anonymous if you’d like… also email in your thoughts or hit social media with them.
 

The Journal: Touring With Dogs, Revisted

I got out on the C&O a couple of times in the last month with Belle Starr and wanted to share some of my newer takes on bicycle touring with dogs.
 
  • Keep your mileage expectations low
  • Rethink priorities – everything gets knocked down a few notches to make comfort and safety for your dog the top two slots
  • Narrow your comfort range when deciding when your tour is a go
  • Take breaks on a schedule in addition to when you need them
  • Expect some deviation in behavior and reaction to food and water
  • Experiment a lot with your setup and be ready to modify
  • Be ready for some wet and dirty paws
  • You will not sleep as good as normal until things adjust
  • Don’t jump into big tours immediately – some dogs thrive in it, others tolerate it for short stints, others… well, you heard the Louis story 😉

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke
Todd Groesbeck
Wally Estrella
Sue Reinert
John Leko

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 183: Touring With Dogs, Revisited appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 182: Facing Your Fears on Bike Tour

On this week’s show, we’re transitioning into fall in many parts of the world, so we’re covering tips on riding and touring during fall weather.

Pedalshift Project 182 - Facing Your Fears on Bike Tour

Photo credit: Miles of Portraits

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 182: Facing Your Fears on Bike Tour (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live is coming in December… what works best? Friday night 12/6 or Saturday afternoon 12/7? Go take the poll here, or at pedalshift.net/live or on FB and weigh in. I’ll announce the date within the next few weeks.
 
The annual Thanksgiving show drops on actual Thanksgiving this year (American Thanksgiving at least, sorry Canada). I wanted to do a refresh of my theme of “thanks bicycle touring.” What are YOU thankful about in the realm of bike touring? Call the Pedalshift voicemail and add your voice to things… take a minute and tell everyone what you’re thankful for. Be anonymous if you’d like… also email in your thoughts or hit social media with them.

The Interview: Facing Your Fears on Bike Tour

facing your fears on bike tour with Miles of Portraits

Annalisa van den Bergh is a graphic designer and visual journalist living with type 1 diabetes (T1D).
Read her story and view her work at workfrombike.com.

Erik Douds is an endurance athlete and global traveler.
Also living with T1D, he strives to show that diabetics can go anywhere and do anything.

Listen to their prior episodes 107 and 122.

– Last time we crossed paths you were in midst of a US tour for Miles of Portraits. I’m curious what you learned on that tour that reinforced or maybe surprised you telling the stories?
 
– The next Miles of Portraits leg is decidedly more international… why did you choose India?
 
– The theme for this tour is something that goes hand in hand with adventure… facing fears. What are the fears you’re both tackling with this tour?
 
– A couple I didn’t know, but I have friends who did know them, were murdered while on a bicycle tour last summer.
Context…see this NYT article. 
How do you process things like this in the context of facing fears on tour?
 
– Let’s talk more about the route you’re planning – where are you traveling and are you focusing on the portraits element most or are you doing events too?
 
– What are the tools you think you’ll rely on most to bridge language and cultural differences?
 
– Any differences in gear for this trip compared to the past ones?
 
– How can people follow and support this new trip?
 
Go support the Kickstarter at milesofportraits.com!

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 182: Facing Your Fears on Bike Tour appeared first on Pedalshift.

The Pedalshift Project 181: Tips on Fall Riding

On this week’s show, we’re transitioning into fall in many parts of the world, so we’re covering tips on riding and touring during fall weather.

Hey it’s the direct download link for  The Pedalshift Project 181: Tips on Fall Riding (mp3).

Subscribe/Follow The Pedalshift Project:
RSSiTunes – Overcast – Android – Google Podcasts – StitcherTuneIn – IHeartRadio – Spotify

Reach out to the show via email, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Don’t forget to join the newsletter too.

Have some bike touring or overnight stories to share? Send your pics, audio or a quick tweet – all welcome. Email the show at pedalshift@pedalshift.net or call the lightly-used Pedalshift voicemail line at (202) 930-1109

Pedalshift Live is coming in December… what works best? Friday night 12/6 or Saturday afternoon 12/7? Go take the poll here, or at pedalshift.net/live or on FB and weigh in. I’ll announce the date within the next few weeks.
 
The annual Thanksgiving show drops on actual Thanksgiving this year (American Thanksgiving at least, sorry Canada). I wanted to do a refresh of my theme of “thanks bicycle touring.” What are YOU thankful about in the realm of bike touring? Call the Pedalshift voicemail and add your voice to things… take a minute and tell everyone what you’re thankful for. Be anonymous if you’d like… also email in your thoughts or hit social media with them.

The Journal: Transitioning to fall riding

  • Take some time to give your bike a once-over
  • Consider a new chain lube for different conditions
  • Water capacity needs lower?
  • Layers
  • Lights
  • Wet leaves are like ice

As always we like to close out the show with a special shoutout to the Pedalshift Society! Because of support from listeners like you, Pedalshift is a weekly bicycle touring podcast with a global community, expanding into live shows and covering new tours like this spring’s DC to Cincinnatti bike tour! If you like what you hear, you can support the show for 5 bucks, 2 bucks or even a buck a month. And there’s one-shot and annual options if you’re not into the small monthly thing. Check it all out at pedalshift.net/society.

Kimberly Wilson
Caleb Jenkinson
Cameron Lien
Andrew MacGregor
Michael Hart
Keith Nagel
Brock Dittus
Thomas Skadow
Marco Lo
Terrance Manson
Harry Telgadas
Chris Barron
Mark Van Raam
Brad Hipwell
Stuart Buchan
Mr. T
Roxy Arning
Nathan Pulton
Stephen Dickerson
Vince LoGreco
Paul Culbertson
Scott Culbertson
Cody Floerchinger
Tom Benenati
Greg Braithwaite
Sandy Pizzio
Jeff Muster
Seth Pollack
Joseph Quinn
Drue Porter
Byron Paterson
Joachim Raber
Ray Jackson
Jeff Frey
Kenny Mikey
Lisa Hart
John Denkler
Steve Hankel
Miguel Quinones
Alejandro Avilés-Reyes
Keith Spangler
Greg Towner
Dan Gebhart
Jody Dzuranin
Lucas Barwick
Michael Baker
Brian Bechtol
Reinhart Bigl
Greg Middlemis
Connie Moore
William Gothmann
Brian Benton
Joan Churchill
Mike Bender
Rick Weinberg
Billy Crafton
Gary Matushak
Greg L’Etoile-Lopes
James Sloan
Jonathan Dillard
John Funk
Tom Bilcze
Ronald Piroli
Dave Roll
Brian Hafner
Misha LeBlanc
Ari Messinger
David Gratke

Music

You’ve been hearing about Jason Kent and his music for many fine episodes. Sunfields’ latest album may be their best yet. Go get it.

The post The Pedalshift Project 181: Tips on Fall Riding appeared first on Pedalshift.